July 06, 2023  71 
Jack Quaid on His Inner Nerd – People

Playing Superman has been a long time in the making for Jack Quaid.

When The Boys star was a child, he took a Batman cape, drew the iconic Superman triangle on a T–shirt and put a “J” instead of the usual “S.”

“I was Super J or Super Jack,” Quaid, 31, tells PEOPLE in this week’s issue.

Now the actor is playing the Man of Steel in the animated show My Adventures With Superman on Adult Swim and Max. In this particular take on the iconic superhero, Quaid voices a young Clark Kent, an aspiring reporter looking for his big break at The Daily Planet when his powers emerge.

Quaid, a self–proclaimed “gigantic superhero nerd,” took preparations for the role seriously. He visited Golden Apple Comics in Los Angeles and read Superman For All seasons, which chronicles the Man of Steel’s earliest adventures and All–Star Superman, a 12–issue series set during the last days of Superman – both of which served as inspirations for the actor.

“I’ve always loved superheroes, and the fact that I’ve gotten to play in the Superman world, it’s just been an incredible honor,” explains Quaid, who is the son of Dennis Quaid and Meg Ryan.

But while he had previously watched other portrayals of Superman, Quaid tried to avoid revisiting them while he recorded lines for the show, not because “they weren’t great,” the actor explains, but because he didn’t want to accidentally slip into simply mimicking those otherwise memorable performances.

“I wanted to find my own take,” he adds. “Everyone who’s been Superman has been absolutely wonderful, but this show had such a very specific tone, and I wanted to make sure this version of Superman really fit in this world.”

The role allowed Quaid to flex his acting chops, as he jumped back and forth from playing the mild–mannered Clark Kent to a more confident Superman, who grows to master his superpowers.

“That was really fun, defining which moments to do it and which to let a little bit more Clark shine through,” he recalls. “I love navigating the two sides of him, but at his core, keeping him Clark, who’s just this sweet guy who genuinely wants to do good in the world and also wants to be a reporter. I think that he genuinely loves reporting and wants to do the best job that he can.”

One of the best aspects of My Adventures With Superman is the relationship between Clark and Lois Lane evolve. Watching the first seven episodes of the show was a “really emotional” ride for Quaid, particularly during the scenes with Clark and Lois.

“There’s something so sweet about them, so genuine, and I can’t believe I’m rooting for a cartoon romance to happen,” he admits. “Their romance is a tale as old as time.”

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June 30, 2023  56 
Jack Quaid on Making Superman More Relatable – Collider

Jack Quaid has done it all. He’s been a part of major franchises such as The Hunger Games, Scream, Star Trek, and Spider–Verse, he plays Hughie on The Boys, which is one of the biggest shows on streaming, and he’s worked with some top–tier filmmakers, including Steven Soderbergh, Martin Scorsese, and Christopher Nolan. This summer, he’ll be voicing one of the most beloved characters in all of pop culture, Clark Kent, better known as Superman, in the Adult Swim animated series My Adventures With Superman.

The anime–influenced series follows a much younger Clark Kent as he begins an internship as a reporter at the Daily Planet alongside his best friend and roommate, Jimmy Olsen (Ishmel Sahid) and the ever–ambitious Lois Lane (Alice Lee). When new threats pose a danger to Metropolis, Clark realizes that he’ll finally have to put his powers to use, which runs the risk of putting his loved ones in danger.

I’ve always been a big fan of Quaid’s work, he was actually one of my first Twitter interactions a few years before I started working here at Collider.

I was lucky enough to get to talk to Quaid about being the new voice of Superman, what previous incarnations he looked to for inspiration, if he’d ever want to play the character in a live–action project, and more.

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June 26, 2023  54 
Clark Kent Has Never Shined Brighter

The Adult Swim series is a reminder of why we’ve fallen in love with these characters over the years.

Superman is iconic. The Big Blue Boy Scout has graced us with his presence for almost 90 years. We all know his story: Krypton explodes, a rocket flies to Earth, and he fights for truth and justice. But how does one redefine the character for a new generation? There have been reboots and retellings of the Superman mythos over the last 30 years, but none are as unique as My Adventures with Superman.

The Man of Steel’s first animated series since the late 1990s, My Adventures with Superman tells the story of a 20–something Clark Kent (Jack Quaid) as he interns at the Daily Planet with his roommate Jimmy Olsen (Ishmel Sahid) and office crush, Lois Lane (Alice Lee). Together, the trio try to make their big break and become journalists for the publication they admire.

A Flawed Superman is the Best Superman
While the younger take is unusual, My Adventures with Superman takes advantage of the new character dynamics beautifully with a Clark Kent who is unsure of himself. He doesn’t know where he comes from or how his powers work, but what he does know is that he has to help those who can’t help themselves, and that is the essence of Superman. What makes this version of Clark stand out above the rest is his inexperience. He rarely has the upper hand in fights, doesn’t quite know how to balance his heroics with his job, and doesn’t know everything about his abilities (how does one find out if they’re bulletproof?).

Throughout all his struggles, Clark finds a way to keep fighting. Superman symbolizes hope and a better tomorrow, and Quaid brings that optimistic energy needed for the character. He’s best friends with Jimmy because they’re both nerds, and the series also doesn’t shy away from that fact. Clark isn’t a stoic, emotionless god, which makes this animated take one of the best in recent memory. He’s still very much the hero we know, but not without his flaws. Quaid’s Clark also may be a bumbling goof at times, but that also makes him all the more lovable.

Superman and Lois Are Still a High–Flying Romance 80 Years in the Making

Meanwhile, the pairing of My Adventures with Superman‘s Lois and Clark works because they want the same thing but have entirely different ways of going about it. Lois dreams of being a star reporter and will do anything to make that dream a reality. Clark admires her drive and falls for her as soon as he meets her. Conversely, Lois respects Clark’s optimism and that he always puts others before himself. In terms of their dominant personality traits, Clark is more reserved, while Lois commands the room. Alice Lee brings so much energy to Lois to the point where it can be overwhelming, but that’s what makes her the perfect partner for Clark. They’re opposites yet authentically complement each other.

It feels very similar to the other live–action Superman series currently on the air, Superman & Lois. While that series shows the couple almost 20 years into their relationship, My Adventures with Superman is about their beginnings, and it is adorable. It’s almost like they were made for each other. Combine that with the wacky antics and conspiracies from Jimmy Olsen, and you have a fantastic group of characters.

The series is not just an office romance, though. Several familiar faces pop up from across Superman’s history. There is an ongoing plot focusing on various villains and organizations throughout the season, and while it isn’t perfect, there’s enough to keep you invested in what’s happening. My Adventures with Superman follows the characters as their relationships develop, and the superhero antics are secondary, but that’s okay. Most superhero stories need strong relationships to have a lasting impact.

My Adventures with Superman is the fresh take that the character desperately needed. It tells fun episodic stories akin to Superman: The Animated Series but isn’t afraid to have long–running plot lines. The art feels modern, with a few anime influences, while leaning into the familiar comic book aesthetic. While the series does have a few pacing issues, and a lack of a strong supporting cast, it more than makes up for it with its slick art and strong leading trio.

Rating: A–

Season 1 of My Adventures with Superman premieres on July 6 on Adult Swim and will be available on streaming the following day on Max.

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June 26, 2023  50 
‘My Adventures With Superman’ Review – IGN

Superman goes Super Saiyan in Adult Swim’s sweet anime–inspired take on the Man of Steel.

The question of who would win in a fight between Dragon Ball’s Goku and DC Comics’ Superman has been a popular debate subject for decades given that they’re both extraordinarily powerful and remarkably good–natured defenders of the Earth. The Adult Swim series My Adventures with Superman doesn’t settle the argument, but it does draw on the parallels between the two characters by effectively fusing them to produce a charming shonen anime–inspired spin on the superhero that feels both fresh and deeply true to the character.

One of the most common complaints about Superman is that he’s both too good and too powerful to be interesting, but those aren’t conflicts that tend to overly trouble the writers of shonen stories focused on fighting monsters with the power of friendship. My Adventures of Superman fits perfectly into that framework, with The Boys’ Jack Quaid playing a young and bright–eyed version of Clark Kent who just landed an internship at the Daily Planet along with his best pal and roommate Jimmy Olsen (Ishmel Sahid).

There they meet slightly more experienced intern Lois Lane (Alice Lee) and form a tight trio more reminiscent of bonds between the characters in Dragon Ball or the Arrowverse’s Team Flash than Clark, Jimmy, and Lois’ traditional hero/sidekick/love interest dynamic. It’s a shift that leaves more room for character development, relationship drama, and complex fights that are solved by teamwork, such as Superman tanking a group of robots while Lois figures out a way to remotely disable them.

A relatively low–powered Superman also gives the show room to lean on the strengths of his allies. Lois is presented as a brilliant investigator with combat and survival skills she learned from her U.S. Army general father. She shares a mix of competence and awkwardness with Clark that makes their romantic relationship feel instantly believable. Jimmy, by comparison, is a bit one–note in the early episodes, where his dominant characteristic is believing in conspiracies about aliens and Atlantis (which of course are all true in the world of DC Comics), but his odd version of genre savvy and general sweetness grew on me over time. Like the ensemble shows Evil and Lockwood & Co., My Adventures with Superman shows that having two protagonists with romantic chemistry and a weird third wheel can be a winning formula.

The plots lean heavily on the crew’s work at the Daily Planet as they hunt for stories that inevitably lead them into dangerous circumstances, making for one of the best portrayals of journalism ever seen in a Superman adaptation. There’s a perpetually exasperated version of Perry White (Darrell Brown), plus a whole smug crew of senior newsroom staff including obnoxious sports writer Steve Lombard (Vincent Tong) and preening lifestyle writer Cat Grant (Melanie Minichino) providing antagonists who only threaten the heroes’ livelihoods, not their lives.

Smallville and Superman & Lois played with the idea that Kal–El was sent to Earth to conquer it for Krypton, and My Adventures with Superman certainly seems to be weaving those narrative threads even tighter in its first seven episodes, flooding Metropolis with strange futuristic technology that has a special connection to Superman. The plot device provides weapons for a parade of villains of the week as the show slowly builds its world and digs into the central mystery of who Clark is and where his powers come from.

A relatively low–powered Superman gives the show room to lean on the strengths of his allies.

Not all of these adversaries are created equal. The reimagining of mad scientist Anthony Ivo (Jake Green) as a tech bro is quickly squandered when he fuses with Parasite, and Heat Wave (Laila Berzins) and Silver Banshee (Catherine Taber) are part of an inept version of Intergang. At times it feels like the writers were trying too hard to tick off names on a list of minor DC villains.

The show is much better when it dares to go weirder – like its deepest cut, the version of superintelligent gorilla Monsieur Mallah (Andre Sogliuzzo) and the disembodied mind known as the Brain (Jessie Inocalla) imagined in Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol run. Here, they’re a couple that just wants to escape judgment and live a quiet life – which happens to involve assembling a mutant army and building a black hole. It’s a hilariously absurd plot that digs into the show’s emotional core and appeals to Clark’s perpetual feelings of outsiderdom.

Superman himself also gets a heavy serving of anime aesthetic, including the charmingly goofy touch of giving him a magical girl transformation sequence when he dons his costume for the first time. When he’s particularly stretching his powers, he sometimes crackles with blue energy, which not only makes him look more like Goku but seems to hint that the show is building to a more complex explanation of where those abilities come from than the usual solar receptors.

But for all the changes, this version of the Last Son of Krypton feels much more like a natural successor to the compassionate version of the character imagined by Bruce Timm in Superman: The Animated Series and Justice League than the more aloof portrayals in recent films. By incorporating anime tropes familiar to younger viewers, My Adventures with Superman might just allow the character to soar into the hearts of a new generation of viewers.

Verdict
Adult Swim’s My Adventures with Superman fuses DC Comics canon and shonen anime tropes to put a fresh and charming spin on the Man of Steel. While there are a few weaker characters, the show’s first seven episodes show huge potential driven by weird villains, complex fights and a tight ensemble.

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June 15, 2023  60 
Scream VI Red Carpet Photos & UHD Captures

The gallery has been updated with UHD captures from Jack’s cameo in Scream VI, as well as HQ photos of him attending the global premiere of the film in March.

Jack Quaid Jack Quaid Jack Quaid




June 10, 2023  75 
Jack Quaid Reflects on Being Nude as Hughie Campbell

Hughie Campbell can’t catch a break! As the entire shows lure follows him seeking vengeance for his girlfriends death, when he is finally granted powers people dream of, that of course goes poorly as well.

With each newer installment of seasons in the live–action adaptation of Amazon Prime’s, ‘The Boys‘, the story becomes more interesting, the humor becomes darker, and in the case of good old Hughie Campbell, he becomes more nude. Funnily enough, long–time fans of the superhero series can expect nothing less from the show now to deliver disgustingly disturbing content going forward in Season 4, and potentially the spin–off series, ‘Gen V’. There was quite literally and repulsively an episode showcasing an annual adult–actioned event where heroes in this universe meet up and have some wild fun.

In the most recent season, that being the third, the show definitely cranked it up a notch with its sickly disgusting nature. The “Ant–Man”, Solider–Boy, and following the storyline of Billy Butcher (Karl Urban) and Hughie Campbell (Jack Quaid), inject a chemical capable of granting its consumer tentative superhero abilities, labeled “Temp V”, which is an experimental successor to “Compound V”, that sees especially Billy Butcher going on a killing rampage.

Butcher was granted a fairly matching power set to that of ‘Homelander’, who was the entire reason he was more inclined to inject himself with the serum in an attempt to stop the super maniac for good. Hughie, on the other hand, was treated more disrespectfully of course, as while he did gain the powers of swift teleportation, the side effect included of any garment of clothing he may be wearing at the time of teleporting would disappear off his body was added as well.

Surely these moments had to be uncomfortable for actor Jack Quaid to do, right? Well, in an FYC interview with Jack Quaid and DiscussingFilms, he had this to say about shooting those nude moments:

I also loved that the reason why he’s being tempted into this dark side is all because of temp V, and I loved being able to actually play with a superpower. Granted, I had to get naked for a lot of it, but it’s a solid trade–off because Nightcrawler is one of my favorite X–Men and I got naked for Nightcrawler powers!

Jack Quaid finds some deserving logic in shooting those bare nude scenes in season 3, as for not the X–Men member ‘Nightcrawler’ being his favorite staple of that team, he might not have been very adherent to this strange side effect of Hughie’s powers showcased. Hopefully, the poor, hilarious moments of disrespecting Hughie Campbell can continue in Season 4, as those are but the funniest of the episodes.

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